News

latest-news1

  • Hidden river once flowed beneath Antarctic ice
    Using the most precise seafloor maps ever created of Antarctica's Ross Sea, researchers have discovered a long-dead river system that once flowed beneath Antarctica's ice and influenced how ice streams melted after Earth's last ice age.
  • Analysis of a 'rusty' lunar rock suggests the moon's interior is dry
    The moon is likely very dry in its interior according to a new study analyzing fragments of the 'Rusty Rock,' a rock collected from the moon's surface during the Apollo 16 mission in 1972.
  • Dino-killing asteroid could have thrust Earth into two years of darkness
    Tremendous amounts of soot, lofted into the air from global wildfires following a massive asteroid strike 66 million years ago, would have plunged Earth into darkness for nearly two years, new research finds. This would have shut down photosynthesis, drastically cooled the planet, and contributed to the mass extinction that marked the end of the age of dinosaurs.
  • Cholesterol-lowering drugs may fight infectious disease
    Scientists found a gene variant that affects cholesterol levels also could increase the risk of contracting typhoid fever. A common cholesterol-lowering drug could protect animal models against Salmonella Typhi, the culprit behind the potentially deadly infection. The findings give insight into the mechanisms that govern human susceptibility to infectious disease and point to possible avenues to protect against pathogens -- like Salmonella or Ebola -- whose entry into host cells is regulated by cholesterol.
  • Antarctic salt-loving microbes provide insights into evolution of viruses
    Scientists studying microbes from some of the saltiest lakes in Antarctica have discovered a new way the microbes can share DNA that could help them grow and survive. The research, based on 18 months of water sampling in remote Antarctic locations, could throw light on the evolutionary history of viruses. The team discovered some of the microbes contained small molecules of DNA called plasmids.
  • Gut microbes may talk to the brain through cortisol
    Gut microbes have been in the news lately. Recent studies show they can influence human health, behavior, and certain neurological disorders, such as autism. But just how do they communicate with the brain? Results from a new study suggest a pathway of communication between certain gut bacteria and brain metabolites, by way of a compound in the blood known as cortisol. And unexpectedly, the finding provides a potential mechanism to explain the characteristics of autism.
  • Scientists create 'diamond rain' that forms in the interior of icy giant planets
    In an experiment designed to mimic the conditions deep inside the icy giant planets of our solar system, scientists were able to observe 'diamond rain' for the first time as it formed in high-pressure conditions. Extremely high pressure squeezes hydrogen and carbon found in the interior of these planets to form solid diamonds that sink slowly down further into the interior.
  • Warmer waters from climate change will leave fish shrinking, gasping for air
    Fish are expected to shrink in size by 20 to 30 per cent if ocean temperatures continue to climb due to climate change.
  • Better odor recognition in odour-colour synesthesia
    People who see colors while perceiving smells are better at distinguishing between different smells and different colors, and are better at naming odors, compared to a group without synesthesia.
  • Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other's actions
    Decades of research has shown that apes, in spite of their proverbial aping abilities, are rather poor imitators, especially when compared to human children. Current theories hold that apes are worse imitators because they lack this social and communicative side of imitation. A new study has instead targeted the interactive side of imitation directly, and finds that the divide between humans and chimpanzees is less clear cut.
  • Repairing damaged hearts with self-healing heart cells
    New research has discovered a potential means to trigger damaged heart cells to self-heal. The discovery could lead to groundbreaking forms of treatment for heart diseases. For the first time, researchers have identified a long non-coding ribonucleic acid (ncRNA) that regulates genes controlling the ability of heart cells to undergo repair or regeneration. This novel RNA, called 'Singheart,' may be targeted for treating heart failure in the future.
  • Into the wild for plant genetics
    A new article reveals the opportunities for portable, real-time DNA sequencing in plant identification and naming. Using a handheld DNA sequencing device they conducted the first genomic plant sequencing in the field at a fraction of the speed of traditional methods, offering exciting possibilities to conservationists and scientists the world over.
  • No guts no glory: Harvesting the microbiome of athletes
    Scientists have tapped into the microbiome of elite runners and rowers, and have identified particular bacteria that may aid athletic performance. The goal is to develop probiotic supplements that may help athletes -- and even amateur fitness enthusiasts -- recover from a tough workout or more efficiently convert nutrients to energy. The researchers will present their work today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.
  • Mechanisms explaining positional diversity of the hindlimb in tetrapod evolution
    Elucidating how body parts in their earliest recognizable form are assembled in tetrapods during development is essential for understanding the nature of morphological evolution. Researchers found in eight tetrapod species that the position of the sacral vertebrae and the hindlimbs is determined by the initiation timing of Gdf11 gene expression. This will contribute to a forthcoming model explaining the coupling of spine and hindlimb positioning - a major step in fully understanding tetrapod evolution.
  • Artificial neural networks decode brain activity during performed and imagined movements
    Filtering information for search engines, acting as an opponent during a board game or recognizing images: Artificial intelligence has far outpaced human intelligence in certain tasks. Researchers are showing how ideas from computer science could revolutionize brain research. They illustrate how a self-learning algorithm decodes human brain signals that were measured by an electroencephalogram (EEG).
  • Archaeologists uncover ancient trading network in Vietnam
    A team of archaeologists has uncovered a vast trading network which operated in Vietnam from around 4,500 years ago up until around 3,000 years ago.
  • Climate change and habitat conversion combine to homogenize nature
    Climate change and habitat conversion to agriculture are working together to homogenize nature. In other words, the more things change, the more they are the same.
  • New gene catalog of ocean microbiome reveals surprises
    Oceanographers report completing the largest single-site microbiome gene catalog constructed to date. With this new information, the team discovered nutrient limitation is a central driver in the evolution of ocean microbe genomes.
  • Gene that makes large, plump tomatoes identified
    Farmers can grow big, juicy tomatoes thanks to a mutation in the cell size regulator gene that occurred during the tomato domestication process.
  • New technique overcomes genetic cause of infertility
    Scientists have created healthy offspring from genetically infertile male mice, offering a potential new approach to tackling a common genetic cause of human infertility.
  • Non-toxic, lubricant-infused coatings deter mussels and prevent their attachment by disrupting their mechanosensory and adhesive systems
    Mussels are one of the worst perpetrators of biofouling, or the unwanted accumulation of organisms on underwater structures. A team of scientists has demonstrated that a lubricant-infused surface effectively prevents mussels from sticking by masking the solid surface with a layer of liquid.
  • New Pathology Atlas maps genes in cancer to accelerate progress in personalized medicine
    A new Pathology Atlas is launched today with an analysis of all human genes in all major cancers showing the consequence of their corresponding protein levels for overall patient survival. The difference in expression patterns of individual cancers observed in the study strongly reinforces the need for personalized cancer treatment based on precision medicine.
  • Communicating in a foreign language takes emotion out of decision-making
    If you could save the lives of five people by pushing another bystander in front of a train to his death, would you do it? And should it make any difference if that choice is presented in a language you speak, but isn't your native tongue? Psychologists know communicating in a foreign language matters. In a new study, they take a major step toward understanding why.
  • Artificial womb raises hope for premature babies
    Researchers hope an artificial womb used to incubate healthy baby lambs can be used in future technology for premature babies.
  • Bacteria stab amoebae with micro-daggers
    Researchers have discovered a type of bacteria that uses tiny daggers to prevent itself from being eaten by amoebae. The scientists also resolved the three-dimensional structure of the mechanism that allows the micro-daggers to be shot quickly.
  • Female mouse embryos actively remove male reproductive systems
    A protein called COUP-TFII determines whether a mouse embryo develops a male reproductive tract, according to new research. The discovery changes the long-standing belief that an embryo will automatically become female unless androgens, or male hormones, in the embryo make it male.
  • How particular fear memories can be erased
    Researchers have devised a method to selectively erase particular fear memories by weakening the connections between neurons involved in forming these memories. In their experiments, they found that fear memory can be manipulated in such a way that some beneficial memories are retained while others, detrimental to our daily life, are suppressed. The research, done using a mouse model, offers insights into how PTSD/specific phobias may be better treated.
  • Reed warblers have a sense for magnetic declination
    Researchers recently showed that migratory reed warblers depend on an internal geomagnetic map to guide them on their long-distance journeys. But it wasn't clear how the birds were solving the difficult 'longitude problem,' determining where they were along the east-west axis and which way to go. The team's latest report shows birds rely on changes from east to west in magnetic declination, the angular difference between geographic north and magnetic north.
  • First successful wild whale shark health assessments performed
    For the first time ever, scientists successfully performed health assessments, including collecting blood and biological samples, taking measurements and attaching satellite tracking tags, to a population of wild whale sharks -- the world's largest fish, classified as 'endangered' since 2016. The research advancement, which occurred in Indonesia's remote Cendrawasih Bay, has significant implications for unlocking the mysteries surrounding the overall health of whale sharks -- including the potential impacts of tourism on their health.
  • Whales turn tail at ocean mining noise
    A new international study has measured the effect of loud sounds on migrating humpback whales as concern grows as oceans become noisier. Scientists have said one of the main sources of ocean noise was oil and gas exploration, due to geologists firing off loud acoustic air guns to probe the structure of the ocean floor in search of fossil fuels.
  • Astrophysicists predict Earth-like planet in star system only 16 light years away
    Astrophysicists have predicted that an Earth-like planet may be lurking in a star system just 16 light years away. The team investigated the star system Gliese 832 for additional exoplanets residing between the two currently known alien worlds in this system. Their computations revealed that an additional Earth-like planet with a dynamically stable configuration may be residing at a distance ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 astronomical unit (AU) from the star.
  • Four Earth-sized planets detected orbiting the nearest sun-like star
    Astronomers have discovered four Earth-sized planets orbiting the nearest sun-like star, tau Ceti, which is about 12 light years away and visible to the naked eye. These planets have masses as low as 1.7 Earth mass, making them among the smallest planets ever detected around nearby sun-like stars. Two of them are super-Earths located in the habitable zone of the star, meaning they could support liquid surface water.
  • ‘Euro Devil’: Fossil of carnivorous marsupial relative discovered in E Europe
    Scientists have discovered fossil remains of a new carnivorous mammal in Turkey, one of the biggest marsupial relatives ever discovered in the northern hemisphere.
  • Brain chemical NPGL controls appetite and body fat composition: Beneficial for our ancestors; potential cause of obesity pandemic
    NPGL, a recently discovered protein involved in brain signalling, has been found to increase fat storage by the body – even when on a low-calorie diet.
  • Florida flood risk study identifies priorities for property buyouts
    A study of flood damage in Florida proposes prioritizing property buyouts based on flood risk, ecological value, and socioeconomic conditions. Forecasters say an above-normal hurricane season is likely in the Atlantic Ocean this year, while a rising sea level is making Florida increasingly vulnerable to dangerous flooding.
  • Deafness in farmed salmon linked to accelerated growth
    Half of the world's farmed salmon are part deaf due to accelerated growth rates in aquaculture, new research has found. The results now offer a better understanding of the effects of a common inner ear deformity, and some specific actions to tackle this welfare issue.
  • Boron nitride foam soaks up carbon dioxide
    Researchers have created a reusable hexagonal-boron nitride foam that soaks up more than three times its weight in carbon dioxide.
  • Superconductivity research reveals potential new state of matter
    A potential new state of matter is being reported with research showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. The ability to find similarities and differences among classes of materials with phenomena such as this helps researchers establish the essential ingredients that cause novel functionalities such as superconductivity.
  • Mystery of how first animals appeared on Earth solved
    Research has solved the mystery of how the first animals appeared on Earth, a pivotal moment for the planet without which humans would not exist.
  • Scientists use magnetic fields to remotely stimulate brain -- and control body movements
    Scientists have used magnetism to activate tiny groups of cells in the brain, inducing bodily movements that include running, rotating and losing control of the extremities -- an achievement that could lead to advances in studying and treating neurological disease.
  • Supermassive black holes feed on cosmic jellyfish
    Observations of 'Jellyfish galaxies' with ESO's Very Large Telescope have revealed a previously unknown way to fuel supermassive black holes. It seems the mechanism that produces the tentacles of gas and newborn stars that give these galaxies their nickname also makes it possible for the gas to reach the central regions of the galaxies, feeding the black hole that lurks in each of them and causing it to shine brilliantly.
  • Why teens take risks: It's not a deficit in brain development
    A popular theory in neuroscience proposes that slow development of the prefrontal cortex explains teenagers' seemingly impulsive and risky behavior. But an extensive literature review finds that much of the evidence for that theory misinterprets adolescent exploratory behavior as impulsive and that much of what appears to be impulsivity is behavior that is often guided by the desire to learn about the world.
  • Tough, self-healing rubber developed
    Imagine a tire that could heal after being punctured or a rubber band that never snapped. Researchers have developed a new type of rubber that is as tough as natural rubber but can also self-heal.
  • How future volcanic eruptions will impact Earth's ozone layer
    The next major volcanic eruption could kick-start chemical reactions that would seriously damage the planet's already besieged ozone layer. The extent of damage to the ozone layer that results from a large, explosive eruption depends on complex atmospheric chemistry, including the levels of human-made emissions in the atmosphere. Using sophisticated chemical modeling, researchers explored what would happen to the ozone layer in response to large-scale volcanic eruptions over the remainder of this century and in several different greenhouse gas emission scenarios.
  • Candy cane supercapacitor could enable fast charging of mobile phones
    Supercapacitors promise recharging of phones and other devices in seconds and minutes as opposed to hours for batteries. But current technologies are not usually flexible, have insufficient capacities, and for many their performance quickly degrades with charging cycles. Researchers have found a way to improve all three problems in one stroke.
  • Popular sungazer lizards under threat from poaching
    The sungazer (Smaug giganteus), a dragon-like lizard species endemic to the Highveld regions of South Africa, is facing an assault on two fronts as farming and industrialization encroaches on its natural habitat -- which already consist of only a several hundred square kilometers globally -- while the illegal global pet trade is adding pressure on pushing the species into extinction.
  • Drug-delivering micromotors treat their first bacterial infection in the stomach
    Nanoengineers have demonstrated, for the first time, using micromotors to treat a bacterial infection in the stomach. These tiny vehicles, each about half the width of a human hair, swim rapidly throughout the stomach while neutralizing gastric acid and then release their cargo of antibiotics at the desired pH.
  • What does music mean? Sign language may offer an answer
    How do we detect the meaning of music? We may gain some insights by looking at an unlikely source -- sign language -- a newly released linguistic analysis concludes.
  • Cassini says goodbye to a true Titan
    Mere weeks away from its dramatic, mission-ending plunge into Saturn, NASA's Cassini spacecraft has a hectic schedule, orbiting the planet every week in its Grand Finale. On a few orbits, Saturn's largest moon, Titan, has been near enough to tweak Cassini's orbit, causing the spacecraft to approach Saturn a bit closer or a bit farther away. A couple of those distant passes even pushed Cassini into the inner fringes of Saturn's rings.
  • Seven complete specimens of new flower, all 100 million years old
    A Triceratops or Tyrannosaurus rex bulling its way through a pine forest likely dislodged flowers that 100 million years later have been identified in their fossilized form as a new species of tree.
  • Eating habits affect skin's protection against sun
    Sunbathers may want to avoid midnight snacks before catching some rays, new research recommends. A study in mice shows that eating at abnormal times disrupts the biological clock of the skin, including the daytime potency of an enzyme that protects against the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation.
  • Cosmic magnifying lens reveals inner jets of black holes
    Jet material ejected from a black hole is magnified in new observations from Caltech's Owens Valley Radio Observatory. This discovery provides the best view yet of blobs of hot gas that shoot out from supermassive black holes.
  • Now you can levitate liquids and insects at home
    Levitation techniques are no longer confined to the laboratory thanks to engineers who have developed an easier way for suspending matter in mid-air by developing a 3-D-printed acoustic levitator.
  • Firmer, fitter frame linked to firmer, fitter brain
    To determine why more aerobically fit individuals have better memories, scientists used magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which measures the elasticity of organs, and found that fit individuals had a firmer, more elastic hippocampus—a region of the brain associated with memory.
  • Cosmic velocity web: Motions of thousands of galaxies mapped
    The cosmic web -- the distribution of matter on the largest scales in the universe -- has usually been defined through the distribution of galaxies. Now, a new study by a team of astronomers demonstrates a novel approach. Instead of using galaxy positions, they mapped the motions of thousands of galaxies.
  • New genomic insights reveal a surprising two-way journey for apple on the Silk Road
    New research reveals surprising insights into the genetic exchange along the Silk Road that brought us the modern apple.
  • Unique imaging of a dinosaur's skull tells evolutionary tale
    Researchers using Los Alamos' unique neutron-imaging and high-energy X-ray capabilities have exposed the inner structures of the fossil skull of a 74-million-year-old tyrannosauroid dinosaur nicknamed the Bisti Beast in the highest-resolution scan of tyrannosaur skull ever done.
  • Mercury is altering gene expression
    Mercury causes severe neurological disorders in people who have consumed highly contaminated fish. Whereas we know about the element's extreme toxicity, what happens further down the food chain, all the way down to those microalgae that are the first level and the gateway for mercury? By employing molecular biology tools, a team of researchers measured the way mercury affects the gene expression of algae, even when its concentration in water is very low.
  • 3D printing living tissues to form living structures
    Scientists have developed a new method to 3D-print laboratory- grown cells to form living structures. The approach could revolutionize regenerative medicine, enabling the production of complex tissues and cartilage that would potentially support, repair or augment diseased and damaged areas of the body.
  • Tidally locked exoplanets may be more common than previously thought
    Many exoplanets to be found by coming high-powered telescopes will probably be tidally locked -- with one side permanently facing their host star -- according to new research.

Share your thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s